Howtos / Articles

Generate new SSH keys

SSH allows the use of encryption keys to be used to allow logging into a system instead of having to remember a plain text password. This is great for use in scripts, and automated tasks, but can be a problem is anyone else ever gets the keys somehow. If the keys become compromised, you must generate new SSH keys. With the increasing use of virtual servers nowadays, if you are creating new servers based on a image file/backup, you may…

Read more [...]

How To Change The SSH Server Port Number

Changing the port number that your SSH server listens on is a simple way to prevent random brute force login attacks against your server. While people can still perform attacks against SSH running on a different port number, most automated tools will default to port 22, and not actually do a full port scan. Any port number can be used, as long as it is not already in use by another service. Note: Make sure you are logged in as…

Read more [...]

How To Disable root Logins Over SSH on CentOS

Most Linux distributions allow the root user to connect in via SSH, and CentOS is no exception. It is recommended that root logins are never used, and you should use either su or sudo to elevate the permissions of a normal user account. As such, the best option is to disable root logins in the SSH server configuration file. Note: these commands should be run as a user with root privileges (sudo or su), or from the console as root.…

Read more [...]

How To Disable root Logins Over SSH on Ubuntu

Most Linux distributions allow the root user to connect in via SSH, however if you try to connect into Ubuntu as root after a default install, you will find that you wont be able to get in. While it may look like the root account is not permitted to login, it is just because that the root account doesn’t have a password set. If you end up setting a password on the root account for some reason, you will be…

Read more [...]

Enable SSH on VMWare ESXi 5 (vSphere 5)

VMWare ESXi/vSphere 5 has the option to accept SSH connections to the server, to allow access to the file system of the server itself. By default SSH is disabled, and its not the easiest setting to find if you do need to enable it. This guide will show you how to enable the SSH server. Load up the vSphere client, and connect to the ESX/ESXi/vSphere host machine you wish to enable SSH on. Make sure the actual VMWare server machine…

Read more [...]



Page 1 of 212